Conference Preview: The Female Wrist: DeQuervain’s Tendonitis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and Basal Joint Arthritis

October 31st, 2014

Mark Vitale, MD will address The Female Wrist: DeQuervain’s Tendonitis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and Basal

Mark Vitale, MD

ONS Orthopaedic surgeon and Hand & Wrist Specialist Mark Vitale, MD

Joint Arthritis at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Dr. Vitale will discuss hand and wrist problem unique to the female patient. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which increased pressure around one of the nerves in the wrist (the median nerve) causes numbness in the fingers and sometimes weakness of the thumb muscles. Fluid retention during pregnancy can cause swelling in the tunnel and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome in women, which often goes away after delivery.  De Quervain’s tendinitis is a different problem caused by irritation or inflammation of the wrist tendons at the base of the thumb. The inflammation causes the compartment (sheath) around the tendon to swell and enlarge, making thumb and wrist movement painful. This condition has also been called “new mother’s tendinitis” because picking up an infant often creates swelling and inflammation of these tendons. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb is a type of arthritis in which the cartilage surfaces between the base of the thumb and the wrist wears out and causes pain and stiffness. It is common in women over the age of 40, and it is 7 times more common in women than men, which is believed to be due to increased ligament laxity and hormonal differences in women. Dr. Vitale will discuss further the reasons why women are prone to these problems and treatment options.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: Adolescent Ideopathic Scoliosis: Recognition and Treatment

October 30th, 2014

Scott Simon, MD, will address the Adolescent Ideopathic Scoliosis: Recognition and Treatment at the 6th

Neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon

Neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon

Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most commonly encountered form of scoliosis where the spine rotates and curves from side to side.  This condition presents between 10 and 18 years of age, often in girls, and the cause of the spinal deformity is unknown, hence the term idiopathic.  While there are investigations on going into the cause of scoliosis, no one cause has been identified, although approximately 30% of AIS patients have a family history of scoliosis, implying a genetic link. The majority of patients are completely healthy and the curve of their spinal is purely a cosmetic issue and has no bearing on their health.  In fact, patients with adolescent Idiopathic scoliosis that also complain of significant pain and/or exhibit abnormal neurological signs or symptoms may require further evaluation beyond a simple x-ray, as such a presentation is not typical of AIS.

AIS is often first noticed during a pediatric well visit or during a school screening where one shoulder may appear higher or one shoulder blade may be more prominent.  When AIS is suspected, typically standing X-rays of the entire spine are obtained that allow your physician to measure the degree of the scoliosis and assess the skeletal maturity of the spine. Assessing the skeletal maturity of the spine is important because scoliosis is at greatest risk for progression during periods of growth.   Any curve with a cob angle greater than 10 degrees is considered scoliosis.

The three main categories of treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis include observation, bracing, and surgery.  Since scoliosis tends to progress during periods of rapid growth, the potential for growth is taken into account when determining what category of treatment is most appropriate.  Curves that are less than 25 degrees are generally observed and followed with regular doctor visits while the patient is still growing.  Bracing is considered for larger curves, but is only effective in slowing the progression of the curve while the child is growing.  Surgery is rarely needed and is generally only reserved for curves greater than 45 degrees, but is the only intervention that has been consistently shown to correct the deformity.  Alternative treatments such as chiropractic, physical therapy, yoga, message, etc. have thus far not been shown to be effective treatments of scoliosis.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: Vertebral Compression Fractures in Women

October 28th, 2014
Neurosurgeon, Amory Fiore, MD

Neurosurgeon, Amory Fiore, MD

October 28, 2014
ONS Neurosurgeon Amory Fiore, MD, will address Vertebral Compression Fractures in Women at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

“Vertebral compression fractures affect approximately 25 percent of all postmenopausal women in the United States. The prevalence of this condition steadily increases with advancing age, reaching 40 percent in women 80 years of age. Women diagnosed with a compression fracture of the vertebra have a 15 percent higher mortality rate than those who do not experience fractures. Because the age group of those older than 65 years is now the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, the incidence of this fracture is likely to increase.  I will discuss the medical and surgical treatment of vertebral compression fractures in women, with a focus on kyphoplasty, a minimally invasive procedure which can provide dramatic pain relief and improve function in patients with compression fractures.”

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: The Role for Stem Cells in Orthopedic Surgery

October 21st, 2014
Orthopaedic Surgeon Paul Sethi, MD President, ONSF

Orthopaedic Surgeon Paul Sethi, MD
President, ONSF

Paul Sethi, MD, will address the ACL Injuries in Women at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Most cells in our body develop into a specific cell type, for example cells that populate the kidneys. Similar to our staying on a “career path,” these cells stay in the same line and continue to produce and generate cells to function within the body part. In contrast, stem cells are basic human cells that have not chosen a cell type (job) but have the potential to give rise to many different cell types in the body.

This is exciting because stem cells may be able to create new cells in existing healthy tissues and may help to repair tissues in those structures that are injured or damaged.

As orthopedic surgeons, we have focused our attention on mesenchymal stem cells. Unlike embryonal stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells are obtained from living adult tissue: from bone marrow in your pelvic bone and sometimes from blood or adipose tissue. Bone marrow stromal cells are the specific mesenchymal stem cells that, in the proper environment, can differentiate into cells that are part of the musculoskeletal system. They can help to form bone, tendon, articular cartilage or even ligaments – all critical elements of musculoskeletal regeneration.

At this point, stem cell procedures in orthopedics are at an experimental stage. It is expected, however, that as more knowledge of tissue engineering is obtained, stem cell procedures will become more common. Active research and current clinical applications show promise in three specific areas of orthopedic regeneration surgery.

Bone Fractures and Nonunions: Traditionally, bone defects have been treated with solid bone, material placed at the site of the fracture or nonunion. Stem cells and progenitor cells are now placed along with the bone graft to stimulate and speed the healing. These may be used in the absence of a bone graft, avoiding a potentially painful surgical procedure.

Articular Cartilage and Arthritis: The lining of joints is called the articular cartilage. Damage to the articular cartilage can frequently lead to degeneration of the joint and painful arthritis. Current techniques treat articular cartilage damage by grafting and transplanting cartilage to fill the defects. It is hoped that stem cells, injected into the joints, will create growth of primary hyaline cartilage to restore the normal joint surface.

Ligaments and Tendons:   Mesenchymal stem cells may also develop into cells that are specific to connective tissue leading to faster healing of ligament and tendon injuries, such as quadriceps or Achilles tendon ruptures. In this case, stem cells would be included as part of a primary repair process. We anticipate our future ability to repair the ACL instead of surgically replacing the ligament.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: ACL Injuries in Women

October 17th, 2014
Katie Vadasdi MD

Katie Vadasdi, MD

Katie Vadasdi, MD, will address the ACL Injuries in Women at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

“The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) functions to stabilize the knee and prevents the tibia from moving forward on the femur providing rotational stability.

There has been a notable increase in ACL injuries and over sport participation in the past 20 years. There has also been an increase in females participating in higher risk sports. The majority of ACL injuries occur between the ages 16-45 years old. 70% of ACL injuries occur from a non-contact event. In soccer, basketball and volleyball, the rate of non-contact ACL injury is 2.4-9.5 times higher in women than men. Women tend to have a smaller ACL, smaller femoral notch where the ACL sits, more genu valgus (knock-knee), and added joint laxity which places women at higher risk of ACL rupture. Women also tend to be more upright when landing or lunging which increases the load on the ACL, and increases the risk of rupturing.

ACL injuries commonly occur in a setting of deceleration with hyperextension and valgus or knock-kneed position. Patients will often describe a snap or ‘pop” and the giving way of the knee.

Most athletes with a complete or high-grade ACL rupture or an ACL tear will require surgical reconstruction with a graft.

Neuromuscular training improves strength, agility and proprioception which reduces the risk of ACL injuries.”

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: Treatment of Bunions

October 16th, 2014
ONS Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgeon

ONS Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgeon

Sean Peden, MD will address the treatment of bunions at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

A bunion, or hallux valgus, is a common cause of both deformity and pain in the feet. Many different things are called bunions: arthritic spurs, calluses, cysts, and gouty crystal deposits. A true bunion is not a growth or bone spur. A true bunion is caused by misalignment of the bones in the feet. And the problems bunions cause are not just limited to the apparent bump – they can lead to arthritis, pain in the other toes, and even dislocation of the toe joints.

When a bunion becomes painful or disruptive it should not be ignored. The most common treatment is accommodation of the bunion, with shoe inserts or orthotics, modification of shoe wear, and other accessories that decrease the irritation caused by a bunion. None of these treatments can fix a bunion.

Surgery for bunions is reserved for cases that cause significant pain or discomfort affecting the quality of life that fail to improve with simple measures. There is no one perfect surgery for a bunion. Surgery is tailored to the patient’s severity, lifestyle, and expectations. In all cases, simply shaving down the prominent bone is not a satisfactory treatment. Realignment of the involved bones is typically required, either by reshaping or fusing these bones in a better position.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

<Learn more about the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference>

Conference Preview: Differences in Women’s Rehabilitation and Performance Training

October 15th, 2014
ONS Physical Therapist Alicia Hirscht

ONS Physical Therapist Alicia Hirscht

Don’t miss the opportunity to attend the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Speaker Alicia Hirscht, DPT, SCS, CSCS will present “What is Different about Rehabilitation and Performance Training in Women?”

“When you hear the term “performance training” you usually envision a young, fit athlete with no aches and pains, running with perfect form, the picture of health. When you hear the term “rehabilitation” you might envision older people on walkers recovering from a joint replacement or a stroke, not exactly a picture of athletic prowess.

There is actually more crossover in the fields of rehab and performance training than you might think. Perhaps your injury is from running, and your rehab consists primarily of high level exercises to get you back on the trails. Perhaps your rehab post- surgery has gone smoothly, but to get back to carrying your 30# toddler 15 times per day requires an advanced set of training.

Women across the age span, from generation Y2K to the baby boomer generation, are healthier and more knowledgeable than ever, expecting to be active well beyond their everyday activities. In this discussion, we will review all the popular terms in the exercise genre: physical therapy, personal training, performance therapy, functional training….the list goes on. We will discuss common injury prevention principles for the female patient and how to keep our moms, daughters and athletes out of rehab and performing to their optimal abilities.”

Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

<Learn more about the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference>

6th Annual ONS Foundation Medical Education Conference: Treatment of Musculoskeletal Issues in Females

October 10th, 2014

ONSF 2014 Medical ConferenceOn Saturday, November 8th orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will address the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference. The focus this year will be on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Females have different anatomic, physiologic and endocrinologic concerns that must be considered in tailoring care of non-operative and operative treatment of musculoskeletal issues. Care of musculoskeletal problems in females will span the gamut from the adolescent female (such as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis) to the adult woman (such as osteoporosis and risk of fragility fractures.) Speakers will discuss special considerations in conditioning for female athletes and care of the injured female athlete. Musculoskeletal conditions unique to the pregnant woman will be covered, including exercise during pregnancy as well as treatment of special problems encountered during pregnancy such as low back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome.  Keynote speaker, Joan Lunden, a renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

For more information about the conference, <download brochure> or visit: 6th Annual ONS Foundation Medical Education Conference.

ONS Foundation Along With NFL Alumni CT Chapter Hold Youth Sports Concussion Talk at Greenwich Library

November 21st, 2013

On November 19th, 2013, the ONS Foundation and the NFL Alumni Connecticut Chapter came together to present a comprehensive program to raise awareness and educate parents and coaches of youth athletes about the signs and symptoms of concussion.  The program was a positive reassurance to parents and coaches that local programs are on top of safety issues to protect our youth.  A medical panel discussed various ways to recognize and treat concussion.

The seminar, entitled Youth Sports Concussion Awareness and Prevention was held in the Cole Auditorium of the Greenwich Library and was attended by approximately 110 parents, youth coaches and athletic trainers from all sports.  The medical panel included Paul Sethi, M.D. – Orthopaedic Surgeon and President of the ONS Foundation; Mark Camel, M.D. – Neurosurgeon and Patricia McDonough-Ryan, PH.D. – Pediatric Neuropsychologist.

Other presenters were Steve Thurlow, President, NFL Alumni CT Chapter and retired Running Back for the Redskins and Giants and Tim Hasselbeck, ESPN Analyst, retired NFL Quarterback and Greenwich Youth Football Coach.  Jim Loughran, Commissioner of the Greenwich Youth Football League, also contributed to the discussion making reference to the NFL’s Heads-up Program.

President of the NFL Alumni CT Chapter, Steve Thurlow.

President of the NFL Alumni CT Chapter, Steve Thurlow.

Time Hasselbeck, George Radachowsky and Casey McKee.

Tim Hasselbeck, George Radachowsky and Casey McKee.

ONS Physical Therapist, Pete Falla, Paul Sethi, MD and Steve Thurlow

Athletic Trainer, Pete Falla, Paul Sethi, MD and Steve Thurlow

What a turnout!

What a turnout!

The Panel discussing the most frequently asked questions about Youth Concussions.

The panel discussing the most frequently asked questions about Youth Concussions.

 

Former NFL Quarterback, Tim Hasselbeck, President of the ONS Foundation and ONS Orthopaedic Surgeon, Paul Sethi, MD and Giants Team Physician, Russel F. "Doc" Warren, MD.

Former NFL Quarterback, Tim Hasselbeck, President of the ONS Foundation and ONS Orthopaedic Surgeon, Paul Sethi, MD and Giants Team Physician, Russel F. “Doc” Warren, MD.

Chris Thurlow, Tim Hasselback, Steve Thurlow and Jim Loughran

Chris Thurlow, Tim Hasselback, Steve Thurlow and Jim Loughran

Bill Cooke, Panel Speakers Tricia Ryan, PH.D. Steve Thurlow, President of the ONS Foundation, Paul Sethi, MD, Mark Camel, MD, and former NFL Quarterback Tim Hasselbeck

Bill Cooke, Panel Speakers Tricia Ryan, PH.D. Steve Thurlow, President of the ONS Foundation, Paul Sethi, MD, Mark Camel, MD, and former NFL Quarterback Tim Hasselbeck and Jim Loughran

 

ONS Foundation and NFL Alumni Concussion Prevention & Management Strategies for Youth Athletes

November 8th, 2013

The ONS Foundation and the NFL Alumni Chapter will present a free seminar on Youth Sports Concussion Awareness and Prevention. The Greenwich Branch of Wells Fargo Advisors is pleased to sponsor the ONSF/CT NFL Alumni Chapter Concussion Seminar. Please join us on Tuesday, November 19th, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the Cole Auditorium at Greenwich Library.concussion

ONS Foundation web logo

 

 

Concussion is a hot topic in the NFL and in high schools and colleges across the country with particular concern about the brain health of players of contact sports. The ONS Foundation and the NFL Alumni Connecticut Chapter want to raise awareness and educate parents and coaches of youth athletes about the signs and symptoms of concussion.

The discussion will cover the latest information on concussion management on the field, in the doctor’s office and what parents/coaches/teachers need to know to support recovery from concussion.

Speakers Include: Tim Hasselback- ESPN Analyst, retired NFL Quarterback: Greenwich Youth Football Coach

Steve Thurlow- President NFL Alumni CT Chapter- Retired Running Back for the Redskins and New York Giants

Panelists Include:

– President of the ONS Foundation, ONS Orthopaedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist Paul M. Sethi, MD
– Pediatric Neuropsychologist Tricia McDonough Ryan, PhD
– ONS Neurosurgeon Mark Camel, MD.

Kindly RSVP to Kelly McCory, NFL Alumni CT Chapter at m3kellymc@aol.com