ONSF 6th Annual Golf Outing

December 17th, 2014
ONSF

Paul Sethi, MD, ONSF President, Vicki Leeds Tananbaum, ONSF Vice President and Frank Corvino retiring Greenwich Hospital President and CEO

ONSF in conjunction with Greenwich Hospital held its 6th Annual Golf Outing on Monday, June 9th at The Stanwich Club.   Following the tournament, the 95 golfers were joined by an additional 75 non-golfing friends and other supporters at a cocktail reception, auction and dinner.

ONSF President, Dr. Paul Sethi honored Frank Corvino, retiring Greenwich Hospital President and CEO, for his dedication to the care and treatment of patients in the community and far beyond.  “Mr. Corvino has been the guiding force behind building a state of the art hospital campus with the world’s best equipment in our operating rooms.  As a result, we attract surgeons from the highest caliber training programs in the world allowing us to deliver unmatched patient care.” In addition, his commitment to ONSF as a member of Board of Directors was recognized.

golf_outing

Practice makes perfect: Golfers warming up on The Stanwich Club putting green.

The event was co-chaired by Michael Clain, MD, Rich Granoff and Vicki Leeds Tananbaum.  Silent and live auctions were co-chaired by Janet Delos, Rebecca Karson, Lauren Mazzullo and Amy Sethi.

Neurosurgeon, Dr. Paul Apostolides, served as “charity” auctioneer and encouraged lively bidding on Live Auction lots.

Over $250,000 was raised and proceeds will expand ONSF’s ability to utilize its Arthroscopy, Surgical Skills and Biomechanical Research Laboratory to enhance future research projects.  The ultimate goal is to further outfit the Lab for studies in motion analysis.

 

ONSF Mini-Med Program: The 2nd Annual Mini-Med Program inspired students with an eye on medicine

November 28th, 2014
Mini-Med Program 2014

Dr.Vitale practicing surgical suturing with a Mini-Med student.

The ONS Foundation’s Annual Mini-Med program was held from June 30 through July 1, 2014 at the Foundation’s Arthroscopy, Surgical Skills, and Biomechanical Research Lab.  

A select group of sixteen students from Greenwich High School, Greenwich Academy, Brunswick School and Stamford High School participated in the comprehensive program. The students, part of STEM program, were chosen from an impressive applicant pool and demonstrated an interest in medicine.  They had an opportunity to participate in an in depth workshop with a focus on orthopedics.

ONS physicians, doctors from diagnostic imaging, as well as physical therapists and nurses introduced Mini-Med students to the field of medicine and surgery through a hands-on experience. Students learned about common orthopedic problems, physical examination and the use of tools in diagnosis. They were exposed to the operating room environment and the different surgical procedures.  Lab work included proper casting techniques, surgical suturing techniques, the importance of physical therapy and how it stimulates the recovery process.  Students submitted their comments.  One wrote,”…I liked the PT and the knee/shoulder arthroscopy.  It was fascinating.”  Others said that the best lectures involved x-ray and MRI. Two other favorites were suturing and casting.

Mini-Med Program 2014

Dr.Greene supervising a Mini-Med student using an arthroscope

“The Mini-Med Program at the ONSF Lab creates a mentor/student relationship that has the capability of changing a young person’s life,” said Dr. Paul Sethi orthopedic surgeon and Foundation President.

Students received an introduction to evidence-based medicine and each was assigned the review of clinical papers by Dr. Sethi. In addition, Dr. Delos and Ray Delacruz lectured on the operating room environment prior to and post-surgery.  Under the supervision of Drs. Vitale and Greene, students were able to practice surgical suturing and casting.

The enthusiasm of these students makes the Mini-Med School rewarding for the medical staff and students. “We continue to modify the program and expand the scope to give students a realistic view of medicine,” said Dr. Mark Vitale.

The 2015 Min-Med School date will be announced soon.

6TH Annual ONSF Medical Conference

November 24th, 2014
Joan Luden and Dr.Sethi

Joan Luden and Dr.Sethi

On Saturday, November 8, 2014, the ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education held its annual Medical Education Conference at Noble Auditorium, Greenwich Hospital. 

The all-day Conference, Treating Musculoskeletal Issues in Females, began with breakfast followed by a CME accredited education course featuring lectures, Q & A and lunch.  ONS orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and a Greenwich Hospital radiologist lectured the gathering of over 130 physicians, nurses, physician assistants, physical and occupational therapists and athletic trainers.  All participants received appropriate CME credits free of charge.  The Conference was made possible through the generosity of an anonymous sponsor who supports ONSF education programs.

Conference Co-Chairs, Dr. Gloria Cohen and Dr. Mark Vitale,  introduced the program and explained that “…patients with musculoskeletal issues have operative and non-operative treatment options…understanding the anatomy, physiology and procedures can assist medical providers in helping the patient regain pain free function.”

The presentations were uniformly excellent.  Lectures reviewed female endocrinology and pathophysiology as it relates to musculoskeletal injury, appropriate non-operative and operative management, and available treatment techniques that assist in the recovery process.  Dr. Vitale, complimenting his colleagues, said, “The talks from specialists in multiple areas of orthopedics, neurosurgery, radiology and physical therapy provided expert insight into issues unique to the active female.  I learned a lot myself from these talks.”  After reviewing comments stated in the Conference Survey, Dr. Cohen proudly announced that “…we are pleased with the positive feedback from the attendees on this educational activity.”

Joan Lunden, award winning journalist and best-selling author, was the 2014 Conference Keynote Speaker.  A health and wellness advocate, Joan has created a brand dedicated to helping women and their families live easier, happier and healthier lives. She selected Best Practices for the Doctor-Patient Relationship as her topic for discussion and enthusiastically addressed the gathered medical professionals sharing stories and sound advice about the relationship of an individual and her medical provider.

The 2015 Medical Education Conference is scheduled for Saturday, November 7th at Noble Auditorium.

ONSF Play Strong Play Safe 5K Run/Walk/Expo Goes The Distance

November 20th, 2014
Dr.Sethi and Dr.Vadasdi

Dr.Sethi and Dr.Vadasdi

The ONS Foundation for clinical research and education held its second annual 5K Run/Walk Expo on September 21, 2014. The event brought group of elite runners, corporate teams, joggers, student athletes, power walkers and future athletes to the Old Greenwich area.

The annual event included a USATF sanctioned 5K (3.1 miles) run that started at the Eastern Greenwich Civic Center, passed the Innis Arden Club and continued through the town of Old Greenwich. Following this was a fun-run for young athletes around a course set up on the fields adjacent to the Civic Center.  Throughout the day participants visited the Expo where they were able to interact with the sponsors, physical therapists, physicians, and learn about proper training techniques.

“The race is designed to promote healthy living and what better way to do so than by starting the day with a healthy activity,” said event co-chair, Dr. Katie Vadasdi.

For some, the run was finished in a few minutes. The first person to cross the finish line had a time of 00:17:53 (00:5:45/mile).  EHS Services was the corporate team to place first in the run. All participants received a medal for completing the course while the top three finishers in each age category received an award.

Fifty future stars participated in the field fun-run. Some of these runners encouraged one of their parents to coach them through their paces.

The Expo provided an opportunity to learn ways to better prepare for a sporting event, how to choose the correct running shoe, and which stretching exercises to do at the end.  Elite Health Services physical therapists and trainers were on hand to advise participants. After the race, some took advantage of the foot and body messages. Through interactive programs at the ONS booth, young children were engaged with tablet computers to learn about nutrition and healthy living.

“We are grateful for the support we received from all our sponsors. They helped make this event a big success,” said Casey McKee, event co-chair. “The support expands every year, and it is these local businesses that benefit as well.”

Some of sponsors included Greenwich Hospital, Fairway Markets, Shore & Country Properties, Chase Bank, Jeep Chrysler Dodge CITY, Fairfield County Look, Granoff Architects, Greenwich Running Company and Elite Health Services among others.

“A special thank you goes out to the Old Greenwich Fire Department who provided one of their hook and ladder trucks and manpower to interact with the adults and children,” said Jon Stellwagen, race organizer. “We also want to thank the Junior United Way, the Boys and Girls Club of Greenwich, and Greenwich Country Day School  for organizing student volunteers.   What an enthusiastic group of kids!”

Coming soon will be the announcement for next year’s ONSF Play Strong/Play Safe 5K.

Conference Preview: “The Female Hip: Pinching, Popping and Pain”

November 7th, 2014

Ronald T. Greene, MD will address “The Female Hip: Pinching, Popping and Pain” at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Ronald T. Greene, MD

Ronald T. Greene, MD

This talk will focus on hip issues distinctly unique to women. Most hip issues for women stem from the anatomy and shape of the pelvis, which is uniquely different than the male pelvis. The female pelvis is wider to allow for childbirth. This anatomical difference can produce areas of abnormal contact between the ball/thigh bone and socket. Tissue damage may result between the points of contact. A wider pelvis can also place undue tension on the muscle and tendons around the hip, which may produce popping and/or pain. We will discuss the treatment for these various female hip conditions including conservative and operative management.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

 

Conference Preview: The Female Athlete Triad

November 5th, 2014

Gloria Cohen, MD will address The Female Athlete Triad at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference

Gloria C. Cohen, MD

Gloria C. Cohen, MD

on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females

Q. Is it okay if I miss my menstrual period when I am training hard?

“First thing to check if you have missed a period is whether or not you are pregnant.  If you are not pregnant, then the answer to your question would depend upon how many periods you miss. Missing more than 6 consecutive periods, or having less than 4 periods in a year, can negatively impact your bone health and leave you more susceptible to sustaining a stress fracture.  The absence of monthly periods, known as “amenorrhea” can be a result of insufficient nutrient and caloric intake for training, which can also impact health and sport performance.  These 3 inter-related components – menstrual periods, bone health, and nutrition – are the three elements of “The Female Athlete Triad”.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Gloria Cohen biking 2

Dr. Gloria Cohen biking during a Triathlon

 

Conference Preview: Patellar Instability in the Young Female and PF Disease in Women

November 4th, 2014

Demetris Delos, MD, will address Patellar Instability in the Young Female and PF Disease in Women at the 6th

Demetris Delos, MD

Demetris Delos, MD

Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

“This presentation will discuss the anatomic reasons that predispose women to episodes of patellar (kneecap) instability (partial or complete dislocation) as well as patellofemoral disease (pain the front of the knee, arthritis etc.)

It will discuss the difference between an unstable patella and a painful one. Though the two may coexist, they typically represent two distinct pathologies that are treated in vastly different ways.

Most patients with patellar instability or patellofemoral pain are successfully treated without surgery. We will review non-operative measures such as rehabilitation, bracing, injections and medications that can improve symptoms in depth. Surgical management involving soft tissue and/or bony procedures will also be discussed for patients who do not achieve the results they desire with non-operative measures.”

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: Musculoskeletal Problems Unique to the Pregnant Female – SI Joint Dysfunction, Pelvic Pain and Low Back Pain

November 3rd, 2014

Tamar Kessel, MD will address Musculoskeletal Problems Unique to the Pregnant Female – SI Joint

Tamar Kessel, MD

Tamar Kessel, MD

Dysfunction, Pelvic Pain and Low Back Pain at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

“Back pain is extremely common during pregnancy.  50-75% of women will experience some kind of low back and pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy. Many of the physiologic and morphologic changes of pregnancy persist for 4-6 weeks postpartum. The good news is that most of the pain will disappear within 1-3 months after delivery. Back pain during pregnancy can usually be blamed on the increased mobility of the pelvic joints during pregnancy. A hormone called relaxin is released during pregnancy that allows ligaments to soften and joints to loosen in preparation for the birth process. This increased flexibility in the joints and ligaments can become a source of low back pain, especially with walking and stairs. In addition, a women’s center of gravity changes as the uterus becomes heavier and larger. As the center of gravity shifts forward, posture changes puts increased strain on the low back and hips. Luckily, there are many things women can do to ease back pain during pregnancy. Practicing correct posture, lifting correctly and exercise are just a few examples.”

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: The Female Wrist: DeQuervain’s Tendonitis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and Basal Joint Arthritis

October 31st, 2014

Mark Vitale, MD will address The Female Wrist: DeQuervain’s Tendonitis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and Basal

Mark Vitale, MD

ONS Orthopaedic surgeon and Hand & Wrist Specialist Mark Vitale, MD

Joint Arthritis at the 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Dr. Vitale will discuss hand and wrist problem unique to the female patient. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which increased pressure around one of the nerves in the wrist (the median nerve) causes numbness in the fingers and sometimes weakness of the thumb muscles. Fluid retention during pregnancy can cause swelling in the tunnel and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome in women, which often goes away after delivery.  De Quervain’s tendinitis is a different problem caused by irritation or inflammation of the wrist tendons at the base of the thumb. The inflammation causes the compartment (sheath) around the tendon to swell and enlarge, making thumb and wrist movement painful. This condition has also been called “new mother’s tendinitis” because picking up an infant often creates swelling and inflammation of these tendons. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb is a type of arthritis in which the cartilage surfaces between the base of the thumb and the wrist wears out and causes pain and stiffness. It is common in women over the age of 40, and it is 7 times more common in women than men, which is believed to be due to increased ligament laxity and hormonal differences in women. Dr. Vitale will discuss further the reasons why women are prone to these problems and treatment options.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.

Conference Preview: Adolescent Ideopathic Scoliosis: Recognition and Treatment

October 30th, 2014

Scott Simon, MD, will address the Adolescent Ideopathic Scoliosis: Recognition and Treatment at the 6th

Neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon

Neurosurgeon Dr. Scott Simon

Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference on Saturday, November 8th. Orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists, sports medicine specialists, physiatrists and physical therapists will present topics related to treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females.

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most commonly encountered form of scoliosis where the spine rotates and curves from side to side.  This condition presents between 10 and 18 years of age, often in girls, and the cause of the spinal deformity is unknown, hence the term idiopathic.  While there are investigations on going into the cause of scoliosis, no one cause has been identified, although approximately 30% of AIS patients have a family history of scoliosis, implying a genetic link. The majority of patients are completely healthy and the curve of their spinal is purely a cosmetic issue and has no bearing on their health.  In fact, patients with adolescent Idiopathic scoliosis that also complain of significant pain and/or exhibit abnormal neurological signs or symptoms may require further evaluation beyond a simple x-ray, as such a presentation is not typical of AIS.

AIS is often first noticed during a pediatric well visit or during a school screening where one shoulder may appear higher or one shoulder blade may be more prominent.  When AIS is suspected, typically standing X-rays of the entire spine are obtained that allow your physician to measure the degree of the scoliosis and assess the skeletal maturity of the spine. Assessing the skeletal maturity of the spine is important because scoliosis is at greatest risk for progression during periods of growth.   Any curve with a cob angle greater than 10 degrees is considered scoliosis.

The three main categories of treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis include observation, bracing, and surgery.  Since scoliosis tends to progress during periods of rapid growth, the potential for growth is taken into account when determining what category of treatment is most appropriate.  Curves that are less than 25 degrees are generally observed and followed with regular doctor visits while the patient is still growing.  Bracing is considered for larger curves, but is only effective in slowing the progression of the curve while the child is growing.  Surgery is rarely needed and is generally only reserved for curves greater than 45 degrees, but is the only intervention that has been consistently shown to correct the deformity.  Alternative treatments such as chiropractic, physical therapy, yoga, message, etc. have thus far not been shown to be effective treatments of scoliosis.

The 6th Annual ONSF Medical Education Conference will focus on treatment of musculoskeletal issues unique to females. Keynote speaker Joan Lunden, renowned author, journalist and TV host, will share her perspectives on women’s health.